Browse

Percutaneous drainage of postoperative abdominal abscess with limited accessibility: preexisting surgical drains as alternative access route

Cited 11 time in Web of Science Cited 12 time in Scopus
Authors
Kim, Young Jun; Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Park, Seong Ho; An, Su Kyung; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Byung Ihn
Issue Date
2006-03-30
Publisher
Radiological Society of North America
Citation
Radiology 2006;239(2):591-598.
Keywords
Abdominal Abscess/*surgeryChild, PreschoolPostoperative Complications/*surgeryRemission InductionRetrospective StudiesTreatment Failure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To retrospectively assess the effectiveness and safety of postoperative percutaneous drainage of abdominal abscesses with limited accessibility by using a preexisting surgical drain as an access route. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was not required. The authors reviewed the medical records of 92 patients (62 male, 30 female; median age, 59 years; age range, 3-79 years) with postoperative abdominal abscesses in whom percutaneous drainage was performed by using surgical drains as an access. Factors evaluated included the location and size of the lesion; time between surgery and the drainage procedure; distance between the lesion and surgical drain; presence of fistula; duration of drainage; type of surgical drain; size, type, and length of drainage catheter; and complications. Technical success was defined as adequate placement of a new drainage catheter into the target abscess. Midterm success was defined as avoidance of surgery or additional percutaneous drainage during the 6 months of follow-up. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to determine factors that affected the technical or midterm success of the procedure. RESULTS: Of 92 postoperative abscesses for which the technique was attempted, 56 (61%) had a subphrenic location and 36 (39%) had a peripancreatic location. Technical success was achieved in 87 of the 92 patients (95%). Technical success was not significantly associated with any of the factors tested. Midterm success was achieved in 75 of the 87 patients (86%) in whom technical success was achieved. Midterm failure showed a statistically significant relationship with the presence of fistula (P = .04). No procedure-related complications were identified. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous drainage by using the surgical drain as an access route is an effective and safe alternative for draining postoperative abdominal abscesses that are less accessible with direct puncture..
ISSN
0033-8419 (Print)
1527-1315 (Electronic)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16569784

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/10081
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2392050301
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Radiology (영상의학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_영상의학전공)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse