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Use of a decision aid did not decrease decisional conflict in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

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Authors
Gong, Hyun Sik; Park, Jin Woo; Shin, Young Ho; Kim, Kahyun; Cho, Kwan Jae; Baek, Goo Hyun
Issue Date
2017-03-21
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18(1):118
Keywords
Carpal tunnel syndromeDecision aidDecisional conflictKnowledge
Abstract
Background
Although a model for shared decision-making is important for patient-centered care, decisional conflict can emerge when patients participate in the decision-making. A decision aid is proposed to provide information and to involve patients more comfortably in the decision-making process. We aimed to determine whether a decision aid helps patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) experience less decisional conflict regarding their decision-making for surgery.

Methods
Eighty patients with CTS were randomized into two groups. The test group was given a decision aid in addition to regular information and the control group regular information only. The decision aid consisted of a 6-min videoclip that explains diagnosis and information regarding surgery for CTS with other treatment options. We evaluated patients’ decisional conflict regarding surgery, knowledge about CTS, and symptom severity as measured by the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire.

Results
There was no difference in the decisional conflict scale (DCS) between both groups (p = 0.76). The test group had significantly better knowledge than the control group (p = 0.04). There was no correlation between the knowledge score and the DCS (p = 0.76). However, less severe symptoms were correlated with greater decisional conflict (r = −0.29, p = 0.02).

Conclusions
We found that a decision aid does not reduce decisional conflict in patients with CTS, although it can help them be better informed. This study suggests that although a decision-aid is effective for patient education, doctor-patient communication should be more emphasized for patients with less severe symptoms, as they can have greater decisional conflict.

Trial Registration
SNUBH Registry 1510/317-003 Registered November 13, 2015
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/110122
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-017-1478-4
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Orthopedic Surgery (정형외과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_정형외과학전공)
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