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Lineage and Society: A Comparison of Korea and China

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Authors
Kim, Song-Chul
Issue Date
2017
Publisher
Department of Anthropology, Seoul National University
Citation
Korean Anthropology Review, Vol.1 No.1, pp. 1-18
Description
This article was originally published in 1997 in 『비교문화연구』 [Cross-cultural studies] 3: 109-129; Translated into English by Ben Jackson
Abstract
Anthropological research on social structure in East Asia entered a new era with the publication of Maurice Freedman’s monumental books, in 1958 and 1966, about Chinese lineages. Freedman examined in the context of Chinese society the classical model of the lineage as a unilineal descent group as established by British social anthropologists in the 1940s and 1950s based on data from African societies. While comparing African tribal and Chinese societies, Freedman inevitably found himself rejecting the argument that the lineage model as asserted by British social anthropologists was incompatible with centralized state systems. He denied, in other words, the position that lineages could not exist in a centralized society as argued on the basis of the logic that the most important social function of lineages in African tribal societies was political, and that African political orders were maintained by the lineages. Instead, Freedman attempted to explain how lineages had continued to exist within the entralized social systems of China.
ISSN
2508-8297
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/117613
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Dept. of Anthropology (인류학과)Korean Anthropology ReviewKorean Anthropology Review Vol.1 No.1 (2017)
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