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Changes to the Korean Family in the Colonial Period: A Study focusing on Divorce Cases in the 1920s

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Authors
Kwon, Heejung
Issue Date
2017
Publisher
Department of Anthropology, Seoul National University
Citation
Korean Anthropology Review, Vol.1 No.1, pp. 45-66
Description
This article was originally published in 2005 in 『비교문화연구』 [Cross-cultural studies] 11(2): 35-62; Translated into English by Ben Jackson.
Abstract
In the field of Korean family studies, the colonial period feels hidden, as if dragged below the surface by the sheer weight of its historical significance. The family was first studied in institutional and historical terms in the West under the influence of Darwin’s nineteenth century theory of evolution. Later, it received attention from fields such as law, medicine, and psychology. The 1920s saw the introduction of statistical methodologies and study of the family became established within the academic system as family sociology. Family studies in Korea show a developmental trajectory almost the same as this, but which begins with historical and legal research. Historical studies include Kim Duheon’s Study of the Family Institution in Joseon (1948), which offers a detailed account of the historical development of changes to the family institution since the Three Kingdoms period. Judicio-historical research includes Jeong Gwanghyeon’s Study of Korean Family Law (1967) and Park Byeongho’s An Examination of the History of Korean Legislation (1974), which address processes of historical change in phenomena such as marriage, divorce, adoption, and inheritance.
ISSN
2508-8297
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/117615
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Dept. of Anthropology (인류학과)Korean Anthropology ReviewKorean Anthropology Review Vol.1 No.1 (2017)
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