SHERP

Characteristic differences in the mini-mental state examination used in Asian countries

Cited 0 time in webofscience Cited 0 time in scopus
Authors
Shim, Yong S.; Yang, Dong Won; Kim, Hee-Jin; Park, Young Ho; Kim, SangYun
Issue Date
2017-07-21
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
BMC Neurology, 17(1):141
Keywords
Mini-mental state examinationCultureAsiaMulti-national studiesCognitive screening test
Description
This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Abstract
Abstract

Background
The mini-mental state examination (MMSE) was adapted by individual countries according to their languages and cultures, though it has not been systematically compared. The objective of this study was to compare the linguistic and cultural variations of the MMSE used in various Asian countries. With this, we can analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the MMSE and consider using a common version in future international clinical studies in Asia.

Methods
We collected the MMSEs used in 11 Asian nations. After translating those into English, we compared them to understand the differences in the questionnaires with regard to cultural aspects.

Results
Many items may be applicable or comparable with a little modification, for Asian countries. However, attention and calculation and repetition may be incomparable. There were some differences in the contents and the ways to administer.

Conclusions
The lack of consideration of the cultural differences and their influences on the interpretation of the same cognitive test makes cross-cultural studies difficult. Some items of MMSE tasks need readjusting for, if any, multi-national studies. This study might serve as a first step in the development of a standardized cross-cultural cognitive instrument, especially in Asia.
ISSN
1471-2377
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/138284
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12883-017-0925-z
Files in This Item:
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Dept. of Neurology (신경과학교실)Journal Papers (저널논문_신경과학교실)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse