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Neural correlates of cognitive inflexibility during task-switching in obsessive-compulsive disorder

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dc.contributor.authorGu, Bon-Mi-
dc.contributor.authorPark, Ji-Young-
dc.contributor.authorKang, Do-Hyung-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Seung Jae-
dc.contributor.authorYoo, So Young-
dc.contributor.authorJo, Hang Joon-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Chi-Hoon-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jong-Min-
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Jun Soo-
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-17T09:07:40Z-
dc.date.available2009-12-17T09:07:40Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationBrain. 2008; 131: 155-64en
dc.identifier.issn1460-2156 (Electronic)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18065438-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10371/21300-
dc.description.abstractA deficit in cognitive flexibility is acknowledged as a cognitive trait for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, no investigations to date have used a cognitive activation paradigm to specify the neural correlates of this deficit in OCD. The objective of this study was to clarify how abnormal brain activities relate to cognitive inflexibility in OCD, using a task-switching paradigm. A task-switching paradigm which has two kinds of task-set was applied to 21 patients with OCD and 21 healthy subjects of matching age, IQ and sex, during an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Compared with the healthy subjects, patients with OCD exhibited a significantly higher error rate in task-switch trials (P < 0.05). Healthy controls showed significant activation in various areas, including dorsal frontal-striatal regions, during task-switching, whereas patients with OCD showed no activation in these areas. Significant differences were also observed in the dorsal frontal-striatal regions and ventromedial prefrontal and right orbitofrontal cortexes between patients with OCD and healthy controls. Correlation analysis indicated that the activations of orbitofrontal cortex were related with the performance in both groups and also with the activation of anterior cingulate cortex in the OCD group. These findings replicate previous studies of cognitive inflexibility in OCD and provide neural correlates related to a task-switching deficit in OCD. The results suggest that impaired task-switching ability in OCD patients might be associated with an imbalance in brain activation between dorsal and ventral frontal-striatal circuits.en
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.subjectBrain/*physiopathologyen
dc.subjectBrain Mapping/methodsen
dc.subjectCognition Disorders/*etiology/physiopathologyen
dc.subjectCorpus Striatum/physiopathologyen
dc.subjectFrontal Lobe/physiopathologyen
dc.subjectImage Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methodsen
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging/methodsen
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Testsen
dc.subjectObsessive-Compulsive Disorder/*physiopathology/*psychologyen
dc.titleNeural correlates of cognitive inflexibility during task-switching in obsessive-compulsive disorderen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor박지영-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor강도형-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor이승재-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor유소영-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor조항준-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor최치훈-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor이종민-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor권준수-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor구본미-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/brain/awm277-
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Program in Clinical Pharmacology (협동과정-임상약리학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_협동과정-임상약리학전공)
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