SHERP

A quest or Historical Truth in Postmodernist American Fiction

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Authors
Sung, KyungJun
Issue Date
1991
Publisher
서울대학교 인문대학 영어영문학과
Citation
영학논집 15(1991): 110-116
Keywords
Metafictional Muse; self-reflexive; The Book of Daniel
Abstract
Since the 1970's there have been ongoing debates about the nature of postmodernist American fiction. Many of the critics involved in these debates tend to think of postmodernist American fiction as metafiction, surfiction, or fabulation, emphasizing the self-reflexive characteristic of these fictions. We can see this trend of criticism reflected in the titles of books: Robert Scholes's Fabulation and Metafiction (1979), Larry McCaffery's The Metafictional Muse (1982), and Patricia Waugh's Metafiction (1984), which are regarded as important criticisms of postmodernist American fiction. Without denying that the metafictional trend is a conspicuous characteristic in postmodernist American fiction, it also appears to be correct to state that postmodernist American writers' concern with the social reality in which they live is an equal factor in the shaping of their works.
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/2319
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College of Humanities (인문대학)English Language and Literature (영어영문학과)영학논집(English Studies)영학논집(English Studies) No.15 (1991)
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