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In vitro ability of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bacteraemic patients with and without metastatic complications to invade vascular endothelial cells

Cited 2 time in Web of Science Cited 3 time in Scopus
Authors
Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Sung Han; Kang, Cheol-in; Cho, Jae Hyun; Bang, Ji Whan; Park, Kyoung Wha; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-don; Kim, Hong Bin; Choe, Kang Won
Issue Date
2007
Publisher
Society for General Microbiology
Citation
J Med Microbiol 56, 1290-1295
Keywords
AgedBacteremia/*microbiologyColony Count, MicrobialCommunity-Acquired Infections/microbiologyCytoplasm/microbiologyEndothelial Cells/*microbiologyStaphylococcal Infections/*microbiologyStaphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification/*pathogenicity
Abstract
Invasion of vascular endothelial cells is thought to be a critical step in the development of metastatic infections in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. This study was designed to evaluate the association between the ability to invade endothelial cells and metastatic infection by S. aureus. Patients with metastatic infection were identified among those with community-acquired S. aureus bacteraemia in a tertiary referral hospital. Patients with simple bacteraemia caused by S. aureus over the same period served as the control group. The ability of each clinical isolate to invade endothelial cells was evaluated by counting the number of intracellular organisms 1 h after inoculation onto human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. The cytotoxic activity of intracellular S. aureus was determined 24 h after internalization, and expressed as the percentage of cells killed. The clinical isolates varied in invasiveness and cytotoxicity. The median invasiveness, relative to S. aureus reference strain ATCC 29213, was 145 % in the cases (n=10) [interquartile range (IQR) 103-160] and 153 % (IQR 111-173) in the controls (n=11; P=0.44). The median cytotoxicity was 59.4 % (IQR 47-68) in the cases and 65.2 % (IQR 50-74) in the controls (P=0.44). Differences in the ability of S. aureus to invade and destroy vascular endothelial cells in vitro were not associated with the development of metastatic complications in patients with S. aureus bacteraemia. This implies that the invasiveness and toxicity of S. aureus for endothelial cells may not be major determinants of metastatic infection.
ISSN
0022-2615 (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17893163

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/25580
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.46765-0
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Internal Medicine (내과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_내과학전공)
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