Browse

Minocycline attenuates neuronal cell death and improves cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease models

Cited 182 time in Web of Science Cited 196 time in Scopus
Authors
Choi, Y.; Kim, H. S.; Shin, K. Y.; Kim, E. M.; Kim, M.; Park, C. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Yoo, J.; Lee, J. P.; Chang, K. A.; Kim, S.; Suh, Y. H.
Issue Date
2007-04-05
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Citation
Neuropsychopharmacology. 2007 Nov;32(11):2393-404. Epub 2007 Apr 4.
Keywords
Alzheimer Disease/chemically induced/*complications/geneticsAmyloid beta-ProteinAmyloid beta-Protein Precursor/geneticsAnalysis of VarianceAnimalsAvoidance Learning/drug effectsBrain/pathologyCase-Control StudiesCell Death/drug effects*Cognition Disorders/drug therapy/etiology/pathologyDisease Models, AnimalHumansMaleMaze Learning/drug effectsMiceMice, TransgenicMinocycline/pharmacology/*therapeutic useNerve Growth Factor/pharmacologyNeurons/*pathologyNeuroprotective Agents/pharmacology/*therapeutic usePC12 Cells/drug effectsPeptide FragmentsRatsRats, WistarTransfection
Abstract
Minocycline is a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic that effectively crosses the blood-brain barrier. Minocycline has been reported to have significant neuroprotective effects in models of cerebral ischemia, traumatic brain injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. In this study, we demonstrate that minocycline has neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo Alzheimer's disease models. Minocycline was found to attenuate the increases in the phosphorylation of double-stranded RNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2 alpha and caspase 12 activation induced by amyloid beta peptide1-42 treatment in NGF-differentiated PC 12 cells. In addition, increases in the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2 alpha were attenuated by administration of minocycline in Tg2576 mice, which harbor mutated human APP695 gene including the Swedish double mutation and amyloid beta peptide(1-42)-infused rats. We found that minocycline administration attenuated deficits in learning and memory in amyloid beta peptide(1-42)-infused rats. Increased phosphorylated state of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2 alpha is observed in Alzheimer's disease patients' brains and may result in impairment of cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients by decreasing the efficacy of de novo protein synthesis required for synaptic plasticity. On the basis of these results, minocycline may prove to be a good candidate as an effective therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.
ISSN
0893-133X (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17406652

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/25981
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.npp.1301377
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Pharmacology (약리학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_약리학전공)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse