Browse

Visions Without Heat: The Search for a Malaysian National Identity, 1948-1990

Cited 0 time in Web of Science Cited 0 time in Scopus
Authors
Soh, Byungkuk
Issue Date
1996
Publisher
서울대학교 국제학연구소
Citation
Journal of International and Area Studies, Vol.3 No.1, pp. 83-103
Abstract
After Perak signed the Pangkor Treaty in 1874, the Malay peninsula, with growing British presence, began to show signs of modernization. For instance, a Western system of administration was introduced. With the establishment of plantation agriculture and a large-scale tin industry, an export economy was initiated. There were also notable infrastructural developments, such as the installment of a modern communication system, which changed the landscape of the peninsula. Along with the process of modernization, one of the most pronounced social changes was the tremendous drastic influx of immigrant peoples into Malaya. This change was closely related to a major objective of British colonial rule in Malaya, which was to maximize economic profits for the home country. Motivated by this objective and biased by their stereotypes, the British attempted to keep the Malays locked in their traditional societal structures. To the British, "Malays... were lazy, unwilling to work for wages and therefore could not be considered a potential pool of labour in the colonial economy" . Accordingly, for tin mining enterprises and especially for the booming rubber industry, the British imported Chinese and Indian migrant laborers, who were assumably more industrious. As a consequence, "British Malaya" became a multi-ethnic society in the 1920s.
ISSN
1226-8550
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/45530
Files in This Item:
Appears in Collections:
Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Dept. of International Studies (국제학과)Journal of International and Area StudiesAsia Journal vol.03 (1996)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse