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Clinical features and outcome of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm: differences between adults and children

Cited 77 time in Web of Science Cited 86 time in Scopus
Authors
Lee, Seung Eun; Jang, Jin-Young; Hwang, Dae Wook; Park, Kwi-Won; Kim, Sun-Whe
Issue Date
2008-12-17
Publisher
American Medical Association
Citation
Arch Surg. 2008 Dec;143(12):1218-21.
Keywords
AdolescentAdultCarcinoma, Papillary/*diagnosis/mortality/pathology/*surgeryChildFemaleHumansMaleMiddle AgedPancreatic Neoplasms/*diagnosis/mortality/pathology/*surgeryRetrospective StudiesYoung Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To delineate the clinical and pathological characteristics of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN), compare them between adults and children, and determine the predictive features suggesting malignant potential. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of patients who underwent surgery for a pathologically confirmed SPN. SETTING: Tertiary care referral center. PATIENTS: Sixty-two consecutive patients who underwent surgery for a pathologically confirmed SPN between 1985 and 2006. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic information and clinical presentation, radiological details, surgical data, pathological characteristics, postoperative course, and long-term survival. RESULTS: Among 62 patients, 47 patients were adults (mean age, 36 years; range, 18-63 years) and 15 patients were children (mean age, 12 years; range, 8-13 years). A palpable mass was the most common presenting symptom in children (9 of 15; 60%) and an incidentally detected pancreatic mass, in adults (18 of 47; 38.3%) (P = .001). The mean tumor size in children was significantly larger than in adults (8.0 vs 6.0 cm; P < .03). In children, the tumor was located in the head of the pancreas (10 of 15; 66.7%) and in adults, in the body or tail (38 of 47; 80.9%) (P = .001). Nine patients (14.5%) had malignant SPN. There was no significant clinical factor suggesting malignant potential. Two patients had a tumor recurrence. They were still alive after debulking surgery. There were no tumor-related deaths. CONCLUSION: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm had different clinical features in adults and children. Because long-term survival can be achieved, even with the synchronous or metachronous metastatic lesions, SPN should be treated aggressively, with complete resection, even if this requires metastatectomy.
ISSN
1538-3644 (Electronic)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19075175

http://archsurg.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/143/12/1218.pdf

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/63076
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.143.12.1218
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Surgery (외과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_외과학전공)
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