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Healing of articular cartilage defects treated with a novel drug-releasing rod-type implant after microfracture surgery

Cited 8 time in Web of Science Cited 10 time in Scopus
Authors
Shim, In Kyong; Yook, Yeo Joo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Ki Dong; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Seung Jin
Issue Date
2008-06-13
Publisher
Elsevier
Citation
J Control Release. 2008 ;129(3):187-91.
Keywords
AnimalsBuffersCalcium Phosphates/chemistryCartilage, Articular/injuries/pathology/*surgery/ultrastructureChloroform/chemistryColoring Agents/metabolismCompressive StrengthDehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate/chemistry/metabolismDrug Implants/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacologyFractures, Cartilage/*surgeryHydrogen-Ion ConcentrationLactic Acid/chemistryMethylene Chloride/chemistryMolecular WeightOrthopedic Procedures/*methodsPhenazines/metabolismPhosphates/chemistryPolyglycolic Acid/chemistryPowdersProstheses and ImplantsRabbitsSolvents/chemistryTemperatureTime FactorsViscosityWound Healing/*drug effects
Abstract
Microfracture therapy is a widely used technique for the repair of articular cartilage defects because it can be readily performed arthroscopically. However, the regenerated cartilage after microfracture surgery clearly differs from normal articular cartilage. This suggests that the clinical outcome of patients undergoing microfracture therapy could be improved. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) is known to protect against articular cartilage loss. Therefore, in an effort to achieve cartilage regeneration of high efficacy, we manufactured a DHEA-S-releasing rod-type implant for implantation into the holes produced by microfracture surgery. The polymeric rod-type implant was made of biodegradable poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate to enable controlled release of DHEA-S. The implant was dip-coated with a dilute PLGA solution to prevent the burst release of DHEA-S. The rod-type implant was sufficiently stiff to permit implantation into the holes made by microfracture. DHEA-S was released from the implant for more than four weeks. Furthermore, eight weeks after implantation into rabbit knees, the implants dramatically enhanced cartilage regeneration compared to control. Moreover, the degradation of the implant over the eight weeks from implantation into the knee did not induce any adverse effects. Therefore, this polymeric rod-type implant does not only provide an improvement in microfracture surgery, but also has great potential as a new formulation for drug delivery.
ISSN
1873-4995 (Electronic)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18547670

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/63630
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2008.04.003
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Orthopedic Surgery (정형외과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_정형외과학전공)
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