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Independent introduction of two lactase-persistence alleles into human populations reflects different history of adaptation to milk culture

Cited 193 time in Web of Science Cited 203 time in Scopus
Authors
Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Jensen, Tine G K; Nielsen, Mette; Lewinski, Rikke; Kuokkanen, Mikko; Rasinpera, Heli; El-Shanti, Hatem; Seo, Jeong Kee; Alifrangis, Michael; Khalil, Insaf F; Natah, Abdrazak; Ali, Ahmed; Natah, Sirajedin; Comas, David; Mehdi, S Qasim; Groop, Leif; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Imtiaz, Faiqa; Rashed, Mohamed S; Meyer, Brian; Troelsen, Jesper; Peltonen, Leena
Issue Date
2008-01-09
Publisher
Elsevier
Citation
Am J Hum Genet. 82(1), 57-72
Keywords
AllelesAnimalsCamelsCultureEvolution, MolecularHaplotypesHumansLactase/*genetics/metabolismLactose Tolerance TestMiddle EastMilk/*metabolismPolymorphism, Single NucleotideSaudi Arabia
Abstract
The T(-13910) variant located in the enhancer element of the lactase (LCT) gene correlates perfectly with lactase persistence (LP) in Eurasian populations whereas the variant is almost nonexistent among Sub-Saharan African populations, showing high prevalence of LP. Here, we report identification of two new mutations among Saudis, also known for the high prevalence of LP. We confirmed the absence of the European T(-13910) and established two new mutations found as a compound allele: T/G(-13915) within the -13910 enhancer region and a synonymous SNP in the exon 17 of the MCM6 gene T/C(-3712), -3712 bp from the LCT gene. The compound allele is driven to a high prevalence among Middle East population(s). Our functional analyses in vitro showed that both SNPs of the compound allele, located 10 kb apart, are required for the enhancer effect, most probably mediated through the binding of the hepatic nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1 alpha). High selection coefficient (s) approximately 0.04 for LP phenotype was found for both T(-13910) and the compound allele. The European T(-13910) and the earlier identified East African G(-13907) LP allele share the same ancestral background and most likely the same history, probably related to the same cattle domestication event. In contrast, the compound Arab allele shows a different, highly divergent ancestral haplotype, suggesting that these two major global LP alleles have arisen independently, the latter perhaps in response to camel milk consumption. These results support the convergent evolution of the LP in diverse populations, most probably reflecting different histories of adaptation to milk culture.
ISSN
1537-6605 (Electronic)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18179885

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B8JDD-4RHHD95-B-N&_cdi=43612&_user=168665&_orig=search&_coverDate=01%2F10%2F2008&_sk=999179998&view=c&wchp=dGLbVlb-zSkzk&md5=7eb61525e2e90212b8cad53ac2d44107&ie=/sdarticle.pdf

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/68124
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2007.09.012
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Pediatrics (소아과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_소아과학전공)
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