SHERP

Dietary phytic acid improves serum and hepatic lipid levels in aged ICR mice fed a high-cholesterol diet

Cited 0 time in webofscience Cited 24 time in scopus
Authors
Lee, Sung-Hyen; Park, Hong-Ju; Chun, Hye-Kyung; Cho, So-Young; Jung, Hyun-Jin; Cho, Soo-Muk; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kang, Min-Soo; Lillehoj, Hyun Soon
Issue Date
2007-08-01
Publisher
Elsevier
Citation
Nutr Res 2007;27:505-510
Keywords
Phytic acidAged miceSerumLiverLipid level
Abstract
Aging is a multifactorial phenomenon. Several clinical conditions directly related to lipid metabolism that induces hypertriglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and cardiovascular disease occur during aging. Attention has been focused on possible intervention strategies to control serum lipid levels. Phytic acid is a plant component in most grains that is the main source of energy intake for the aged, and its antioxidant and antinutrient effects have been reported. However, its effect on lipid metabolism in the aged model has not been evaluated. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of phytic acid on serum and hepatic lipid levels in aged mice. A total of 40 aged ICR male mice were fed purified diets supplemented with 0% (P0), 0.5% (P5), 1.0% (P10), and 1.5% (P15) sodium phytate for 12 weeks. There were no significant differences in food intake, body weight, and organ weight among the experimental groups. The concentrations of the serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hepatic triacylglycerol, and total cholesterol, and the apparent absorption rates of total lipid and cholesterol were lower in the P15 group than in the P0 group. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of all groups fed phytate-containing diets were higher than that of the P0 group. The severity of fatty liver decreased as phytate percentage in the diet increased. The amounts of fecal total lipid, triacyglycerol, and total cholesterol were higher in the P10 and the P15 groups. These results suggested that phytate affect the serum and hepatic lipid levels in aged mice by increasing their fecal lipid content. Consuming phytate-rich foods may reduce serum and hepatic lipid levels in the aged.
ISSN
0271-5317
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/6976
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2007.05.003
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Appears in Collections:
College of Veterinary Medicine (수의과대학)Dept. of Veterinary Medicine (수의학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_수의학과)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse