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Non-invasive cortical stimulation improves post-stroke attention decline

Cited 62 time in Web of Science Cited 81 time in Scopus
Authors
Kang, Eun Kyoung; Baek, Min Jae; Kim, SangYun; Paik, Nam-Jong
Issue Date
2009
Publisher
IOS PRESS
Citation
RESTORATIVE NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSCIENCE; Vol.27 6; 647-652
Keywords
Attentioncognitioncortical stimulationtDCSstroke
Abstract
Purpose: Attention decline after stroke is common and hampers the rehabilitation process, and non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has the potential to elicit behavioral changes by modulating cortical excitability. The authors tested the hypothesis that a single session of non-invasive cortical stimulation with excitatory anodal tDCS applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) can improve attention in stroke patients. Methods: Ten patients with post-stroke cognitive decline (MMSE <= 25) and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in this double blind, sham-controlled, crossover study involving the administration of real (2 mA for 20 min) or sham stimulation (2 mA for 1 min) to the left DLPFC. Attention was measured using a computerized Go/No-Go test before and after intervention. Improvements in accuracy and speed after stimulation relative to baseline were compared for real and sham stimulations. Results: In healthy controls, no significant improvement in Go/No-Go test was observed after either real or sham stimulation. However, in stroke patients, tDCS led to a significant improvement in response accuracy at 1 hour post-stimulation relative to baseline, and this improvement was maintained until 3 hours post-stimulation (P < 0.05), whereas sham stimulation did not lead to a significant improvement in response accuracy (P > 0.05). Changes in reaction times were comparable for the two stimulations (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Non invasive anodal tDCS applied to the left DLPFC was found to improve attention versus sham stimulation in stroke patients, which suggests that non-invasive cortical intervention could potentially be used during rehabilitative training to improve attention.
ISSN
0922-6028
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/77134
DOI
https://doi.org/10.3233/RNN-2009-0514
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Dept. of Neurology (신경과학교실)Journal Papers (저널논문_신경과학교실)
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