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Self-Employment in Business among U.S. Ethnic Groups

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Authors
Yoon, In-Jin
Issue Date
1996-07
Publisher
Population and Development Studies Center, Seoul National University
Citation
Korea Journal of Population and Development, Vol.25 No.1, pp. 123-154
Abstract
The intergroup variations in self-employment rates are understood as the outcome of the interaction of the following three factors: employment opportunity structures in the labor market, business opportunity structures, and the relative organizing capacity of members of an ethnic group to mobilize resources. This interactive model of ethnic entrepreneurship is applied to the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, whites, and blacks in the United States. The data for this study come from the 1 % and 5% samples of the 1980 and 1990 U.S. Censuses. The main findings are as follows. First, Chinese and Korean immigrants with college grades are most likely to be self-employed due to the combination of labor market disadvantage and resource advantage. Second, Japanese and white immigrants with college grades are not likely to be self-employed due to labor market advantage. Finally, American blacks are the least likely to be self-employed due to the combination of the low value attached to self-employment and resource disadvantage.
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/85267
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Institute for Social Development and Policy Research (사회발전연구소)Development and SocietyKorea Journal of Population and Development Vol.25 No.1/2 (1996)
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