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Presidential Elections, Internet Politics, And Citizens’ Organizations in South Korea

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Authors
Shin, Eui Hang
Issue Date
2005-06
Publisher
Institute for Social Development and Policy Research, Center for Social Sciences, Seoul National University
Citation
Development and Society, Vol.34 No.1, pp. 25-47
Keywords
South Koreapresidential electioncitizens’ organizationsInternet politicsconsolidation of democracy
Abstract
South Korea has undergone a rapid process of democratization over the past decade. Two factors stand out as forces that have significantly influenced the democratic transition: the growth of citizens’' organizations and the Internet news services that have provided the forum for citizens’' participation in formulating public opinion. The primary purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of Internet politics and citizens’' organizations on the nomination and campaign processes of the 2002 presidential election in South Korea. The two major presidential candidates, Roh Moo Hyun of the Millennium Democratic Party (MDP) and Lee Hoi Chang of the Grand National Party (GNP), had diametrically opposing characteristics, not only in ideological and political stances, but also in personal and family backgrounds. An important aspect of the 2002 South Korean presidential election was that major parties selected their nominees through presidential primaries, the first time ever in the history of South Korean presidential elections. A citizens’' political fan club (Nosamo) played a critical role in the MDP primaries as well as in Roh Moo Hyun’'s winning campaign in the presidential election, by mobilizing young voters as a formidable voting bloc. In addition, the Oh my News, an on-line news service organization, empowered voters to effectively respond to changing conditions in the presidential race and organized a series of anti- American candlelight demonstrations that helped to solidify the progressive segment of voters in supporting Roh Moo Hyun. Citizens’' organizations and Internet politics

would continue to make significant contributions to the consolidation of democracy in South Korea.
ISSN
1598-8074
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/86669
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Institute for Social Development and Policy Research (사회발전연구소)Development and Society Development and Society Vol.34 No.1/2 (2005)
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