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Trust and Confidence in Government in Transitional Democracies: South Korea in Comparative Perspective

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Authors
Ahn, Chung-Si; Kang, Won-Taek
Issue Date
2002
Publisher
서울대학교 한국정치연구소
Citation
한국정치연구, Vol.11 No.1, pp. 3-40
Abstract
Democracy has emerged as the leading political system in the post cold war world. While liberal democracy has no real rivals, however, political distrust and the growth of 'critical', 'disaffected' citizenry are the troubling reality of contemporary democracies everywhere. Studies show that over the past decades a loss of confidence in government and public institutions is almost a universal phenomenon. Citizens in most of the democracies have become less satisfied with their political institutions than they were decades before. (Nye, Zelikow, and King, 1997; Norris, 1999; pharr and Putnam, 2000) Confjdence in government has declined in many countries in the old, established democracies, as well as the new, nascent democracies. Trust, confidence, and satisfaction in politics are widely held intimately connected to the effectiveness of democratic government and the durability of democratic institutions. (Putnam, 1993; Fukuyama, 1995; Warren, 1999)
ISSN
1738-7477
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/90009
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Institute of Korean Political Studies (한국정치연구소)한국정치연구 (Journal of Korean Politics)한국정치연구 Volume 11 Number 1/2 (2002)
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