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Challenges to Democratic Governance in Indonesia

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Authors
Kadir, Suzaina
Issue Date
2002
Publisher
서울대학교 한국정치연구소
Citation
한국정치연구, Vol.11 No.1, pp. 89-115
Abstract
Indonesia began its protracted transition to democracy in May 1998 when the thirty-two year reign of General Suharto came to an abrupt end amidst violent demonstrations on the streets of Jakarta. Suharto transferred power to a civilian, B.J. Habibie, who proceeded to lift the existing ban on the number of political parties and announced that general elections would be held within a year. This led to an impressive mushrooming of political parties, from three to one hundred and forty-eight within a matter of a few months. The euphoria in the country was hard to mask as once-banned publications resurfaced while various associations and organizations found new voices in the public arena. The general elections held a year later was seen by many as a culmination of Indonesia's political transition. There were pronouncements of hope from Indonesian and foreign observers alike that the country was finally on its way to setting up a democratic political system.
ISSN
1738-7477
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/90011
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Institute of Korean Political Studies (한국정치연구소)한국정치연구 (Journal of Korean Politics)한국정치연구 Volume 11 Number 1/2 (2002)
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