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The Spatial Structure of Cities in the United States

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Authors
Knaap, Gerrit-Jan; Lewis, Rebecca; Schindewolf, Jamie
Issue Date
2014-03
Publisher
서울대학교 국토문제연구소
Citation
지리학논총, Vol.59/60, pp. 1-26
Keywords
spatial structurepopulationpopulation densityUnited States
Abstract
In recent years, the spatial structure of cities has become the subject of considerable interest, as travel behavior, greenhouse gas emissions, loss of habitat, public expenditures, and more are thought to be influenced by urban spatial structure. In this paper we examine the spatial structure of 35 metropolitan areas in the United States. Based on the 2010 Census data, we focus on the distributions of populations in metropolitan areas in 2010 and on changes between 1990 and 2010. Specifically, we examine population levels and population density at the metropolitan, urbanized area, principal city, and census block group levels. We find that significant differences in recent growth patterns remain between the older and more densely developed cities of the Northeast and cities in the South and West. Most urban growth is now occurring in cities in the South and West causing them to experience increases in density in their principal cities, urbanized area, and nonurbanized areas. We also find, however, that much of the population growth in the largest metropolitan areas of the United States continues to occur at the urban fringe, causing overall densities to decline.
ISSN
1226-5888
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/92225
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Institute for Korean Regional Studies (국토문제연구소)지리학논총 (Journal of Geography)지리학논총 Volume 59/60 (2014)
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