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Japan’s Security Renaissance: Evolution or Revolution?

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Authors
Tang, Siew-Mun
Issue Date
2007-06
Publisher
Institute of International Affairs, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University
Citation
Journal of International and Area Studies, Vol.14 No.1, pp. 17-29
Keywords
Yoshida doctrineKoizumi doctrineJapanese securityStructural power
Abstract
Change has been the dominant theme in Japan for the last decade, and none is more profound than the transformation in Japan’s security policy. The seemingly immovable Yoshida doctrine is crumbling under the Koizumi administration’s efforts to beef up the nation’s security in response to the North Korean threat. Within the last few years, Japan saw the first post-1945 overseas deployment of the Self-Defense Forces and the launching of its first spy satellite. To many, this represents a revolutionary change in Japanese security posture, but in reality they are the culmination of a long-drawn evolutionary process that begun since the end of the Cold War. This paper argues that the current security renaissance is a sign of the emerging Koizumi Doctrine grand strategy, in which Japan aims to eradicate the “economic giant, political pygmy” moniker by expanding its global influence through limited global security cooperation.
ISSN
1226-8550
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/96446
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Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Dept. of International Studies (국제학과)Journal of International and Area StudiesJournal of International and Area Studies vol.14 (2007)
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