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Ethnic Growth and Shifts in U.S. Metropolitan Areas in the 1990s

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Authors
Park, Chi-Hyoung
Issue Date
2011-12
Publisher
Institute of International Affairs, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University
Citation
Journal of International and Area Studies, Vol.18 No.2, pp. 75-87
Keywords
U.S. MetropolitanEthnic Growth and ShiftPopulationCentral and Suburban City
Abstract
Growth and shifts in the three largest ethnic groups (Hispanics, Blacks, and Asians) in central and

suburban cities are compared with respect to census regions (South and West versus Midwest and

Northeast) and population in Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). The writing on the geography of

ethnicity involves more comprehensive data collection and analysis to compare previous studies.

Conclusion from this research demonstrates that the geographic characteristics of Blacks, Hispanics,

and Asians differ in central and suburban cities between 1990 and 2000. Ethnic growth caused the

census regions of Southern and Western metropolitan areas to become increasingly diverse ethnically

and racially during the decade. The Black population grew in the central cities of census South and

West regions, while Hispanic and Asian populations grew South and West suburban cities.
ISSN
1226-8550
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/96522
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Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Dept. of International Studies (국제학과)Journal of International and Area StudiesJournal of International and Area Studies vol.18 (2011)
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