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Reputation Matters: Evidence From the Korean War

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Authors
Meyers, John Speed
Issue Date
2015-12
Publisher
Institute of International Affairs, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University
Citation
Journal of International and Area Studies, Vol.22 No.2, pp. 19-37
Keywords
ReputationMilitary AssessmentPerceptionsKorean War
Abstract
Both sides in the Korean War calculated their adversary’s military power and diplomatic resolve by studying their enemy’s past behavior in addition to their enemy’s current military posture and diplomatic actions. Past decisions to yield provided adversaries with private information about how leaders perceived their own state’s military power and resolve. Enemies judged a state that recently yielded as militarily weak or diplomatically indifferent. The preponderance of evidence suggests that leaders should protect their reputation.
ISSN
1226-8550
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/96601
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Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Dept. of International Studies (국제학과)Journal of International and Area StudiesJournal of International and Area Studies vol.22 (2015)
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