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Production of Interspecific Germline Chimeras via Embryo Replacement

Cited 3 time in Web of Science Cited 5 time in Scopus
Authors
Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Hyung Chul; Kang, Kyung Soo; Lee, Hyo Gun; Ono, Tamao; Nagai, Hiroki; Sheng, Guojun; Han, Jae Yong
Issue Date
2015
Publisher
Society for the Study of Reproduction
Citation
Biology of Reproduction, vol.93 no.2, pp. 36-42
Keywords
chickenembryo replacementinterspecies germline chimeraprimordial germ cellquail
Description
This is an Open Access article, freely available through Biology of Reproductions Authors Choice option.
Abstract
In avian species, primordial germ cells (PGCs) use the vascular system to reach their destination, the genital ridge. Because of this unique migratory route of avian germ cells, germline chimera production can be achieved via germ cell transfer into a blood vessel. This study was performed to establish an alternative germ cell-transfer system for producing germline chimeras by replacing an original host embryo with a donor embryo, while retaining the host extraembryonic tissue and yolk, before circulation. First, to test the migratory capacity of PGCs after embryo replacement, Korean Oge (KO) chick embryos were used to replace GFP transgenic chick embryos. Four days after replacement, GFP-positive cells were detected in the replaced KO embryonic gonads, and genomic DNA PCR analysis with the embryonic gonads demonstrated the presence of the GFP transgene. To produce an interspecific germline chimera, the original chick embryo proper was replaced with a quail embryo onto the chick yolk. To detect the gonadal PGCs in the 5.5-day-old embryonic gonads, immunohistochemistry was performed with monoclonal antibodies specific to either quail or chick PGCs, i.e., QCR1 and anti-stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), respectively. Both the QCR1-positive and SSEA-1-positive cells were detected in the gonads of replaced quail embryos. Forty percent of the PGC population in the quail embryos was occupied by chick extraembryonically derived PGCs. In conclusion, replacement of an embryo onto the host yolk before circulation can be applied to produce interspecies germline chimeras, and this germ cell-transfer technology is potentially applicable for reproduction of wild or endangered bird species.
ISSN
0006-3363
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/100425
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.114.127365
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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (농업생명과학대학)Dept. of Food and Animal Biotechnology (식품·동물생명공학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_식품·동물생명공학부)
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