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Making the Cold War Their Own: Inter-Korean Relations, 1971-1976
한반도 냉전의 내재화: 남북한 관계 1971-1976

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dc.contributor.advisor박태균-
dc.contributor.authorRia Chae-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T08:31:02Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-25-
dc.date.issued2015-08-
dc.identifier.other000000067359-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/119625-
dc.description학위논문 (박사)-- 서울대학교 국제대학원 : 국제학과, 2015. 8. 박태균.-
dc.description.abstractThe main goals of this dissertation are to find the origins of the Cold War between North and South Korea and to explain the reasons why the Cold War on the Korean Peninsula did not finish with the end of the global Cold War in the early 1990s.
The dissertation focuses on the period of the 1970s, which was the time of the first peaceful negotiations between the two Koreas but also the time of one of the worst security crises since the Korean War. Using declassified diplomatic and policy documents from the archives of South Korea, the United States, and countries of the former socialist bloc
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dc.description.abstractpress reports-
dc.description.abstractmemoirs of witnesses-
dc.description.abstractand oral history records-
dc.description.abstractthe dissertation reconstructs the events of the early to mid-1970s as a dynamic interaction between the two Korean governments, the United States, and China. The analysis demonstrates that fundamental changes took place in the inter-Korean relationship during the period of 1971 to 1976. Through this transformation, the Cold War on the Korean Peninsula became qualitatively different: it was internalized by the two regimes and thereby obtained a life of its own.
The global Cold War was centered on the conflict between two superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union. The defining features of that conflict included political, economic, and propaganda rivalry
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dc.description.abstractideological conflict-
dc.description.abstractabsence of a direct military conflict but an arms race in conventional and nuclear weapons-
dc.description.abstractcontinuous communication-
dc.description.abstractand alternating periods of increased hostility and relaxation of tensions.
Through the period from liberation to the late 1960s, Korea was firmly embedded in the global Cold War system. Nevertheless, the behavior of the two Koreas during that period was different from the pattern of the Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union. An ideological conflict and propaganda rivalry existed but the political, economic, and diplomatic rivalry did not appear?and even that only in incipient forms and indirectly?until the 1960s. There was no communication between the two Koreas, nor was there room for a detente. While implementing their projects of nation-building and policies of containment in Korea before and after the Korean War, the great powers also had to make constant efforts to keep the Korean conflict cold by curbing their respective proteges from opening hostilities against each other. In other words, until the late 1960s, the Cold War in Korea was imposed and instigated by the great powers.
In contrast, during the period of 1971 to 1976, the relationship between the two Koreas acquired the characteristics of the Cold War between the superpowers. Seoul and Pyongyang de facto recognized each others existence and established contact for the first time. At the same time, the two engaged in a direct, economic, and political competition without being incited to do so by their patrons. The competition for diplomatic recognition, and propaganda rivalry between South and North Korea?particularly at the United Nations?reached a scale not seen in any other period and the inter-Korean arms race also surpassed in its intensity any other time since Korean War. The Axe Murders incident brought the two Korean regimes to the brink of an all-out war but the two opted out of a head-on collision. Through this process, the Cold War was institutionalized in Korea, as reflected in the continuous cycles of short rapprochement and long confrontation repeated thereafter. That is the reason why the Cold War on the Korean Peninsula was able to persist despite the end of the Cold War between the great powers.
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dc.description.tableofcontentsABSTRACT…………………………………………………………………….i
TABLE OF CONTENTS……………………………………………………….iv
NOTE ON TRANSLITERATION……………………………………………vii
I. INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………….1
1. Unending Cold War on the Korean Peninsula……………………….1
2. The 1970s of the Korean Peninsula in Scholarship………………….9
3. Analytical Framework……………………………………………...18
4. Research limitations………………………………………………..24
5. Usage of Terms……………………………………………………..26

II. THE COLD WAR ON THE KOREAN PENINSULA PRIOR TO THE 1970S……………………………………………………………………..39
Introduction……………………………………………………………..39
1. A Hot War in the Cold War…………………………………………40
2. Unattainable Dreams………………………………………………63
3. Clashes under the Armistice System……………………………….77

III. TRANSFORMATIONS AT THE TURN OF THE 1970S………………97
Introduction………………………………………………………….…97
1. The Nixon Doctrine, Beginning of Sino-American Rapprochement, and the Two Koreas……………………………………………….100
2. View from Pyongyang: Threats and Opportunities……………….111
3. View from Seoul: Fears and Solutions……………………………129
4. The Inter-Korean Dialogue and Diplomatic Competition………...133

IV. POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, AND PROPAGANDA RIVALRY, 1973 ? 1974…………………………………………………………………...137
Introduction……………………………………………………………137
1. Park Chung Hees June 23 Anouncement and Change in the Direction of South Koreas Foreign Policy………………………………….138
2. The Demise of the Inter-Korean Dialogue and the Transformation in North Koreas Strategy………………………………………..….159
3. The US search for Alternatives and Chinas About-face………….178

V. SECURITY AND DIPLOMATIC CRISIS, 1975-1976……………….191
Introduction…………………………………………………………...191
1. Kim Il Sungs Visit to Beijing in April 1975: Intentions and Consequences…………………………………………………….192
2. Diplomatic Competition of 1975…………………………………197
3. Diplomatic Campaigns of 1976: North Korea vs. South Korea and the US……………………………………………………………206
4. Panmunjom Axe Murders, Climax of the Crisis, and Retreat…….214

VI. INTERNALIZATION OF THE COLD WAR ON THE KOREAN PENINSULA…………………………………………………………223
1. The Korean Detente and the UN…………………………………223
2. Responsibility for the Failure of the Korean Detente…………….234
3. A Cold War of Their Own…………………………………………245

VII. CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………252
1. Summary of Research Findings……………………………………252
2. Implications and Directions for Future Research…………………260

REFERENCES…………………………………………………………………265
ABSTRACT IN KOREAN……………………………………………………296
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……………………………………………………299
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dc.formatapplication/pdf-
dc.format.extent4105408 bytes-
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisher서울대학교 국제대학원-
dc.subjectCold War-
dc.subjectInter-Korean Relations-
dc.subjectInternalization-
dc.subjectDétente-
dc.subject1970s-
dc.subject.ddc327-
dc.titleMaking the Cold War Their Own: Inter-Korean Relations, 1971-1976-
dc.title.alternative한반도 냉전의 내재화: 남북한 관계 1971-1976-
dc.typeThesis-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor채리아-
dc.description.degreeDoctor-
dc.citation.pagesvii,301-
dc.contributor.affiliation국제대학원 국제학과-
dc.date.awarded2015-08-
Appears in Collections:
Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Dept. of International Studies (국제학과)Theses (Ph.D. / Sc.D._국제학과)
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