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Critique of Japan as an East-West Literary Hybrid in Yoko Tawada’s Kafka Kaikoku

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Authors
Roberts, Lee M.
Issue Date
2017-06
Publisher
서울대학교 외국어교육연구소
Citation
외국어교육연구, Vol.20, pp. 17-39
Keywords
Yoko TawadaFranz KafkaIzumi Kyōkalinguistic and cultural transformationadaptationtranslationlanguage learning, modernityEast-West clashcultural hybridityDie VerwandlungMetamorphosis
Abstract
Yoko Tawada’s drama Kafka Kaikoku (2013) depicts Japan’s encounter with Western culture from the Meiji era on as the catalyst for a metamorphosis much like Gregor Samsa’s in the work of the same name by Franz Kafka. Ironically, the victim of this East-West clash turns out to be Izumi Kyōka (1873- 1939), a man who was anything but an enthusiastic adopter of European literary style. Interweaving elements also from Kafka’s Ein Landarzt (A Country Doctor, 1919), Tawada’s play suggests further that Izumi’s fate was set, since he—and, by extension, all Japanese—could not resist roles the West had prepared for him. Ultimately, this article explains, Kafka Kaikoku offers a critical view of modernization as a force that made Japanese into beings with a hybrid literary consciousness who lacked both much of their own native particularity and also their very humanity.
ISSN
1229-5892
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/135075
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College of Education (사범대학)Foreign Language Education Research Institute (외국어교육연구소)외국어교육연구 (Foreign Language Education Research)외국어교육연구 (Foreign Language Education Research) vol.20-21 (2017)
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