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(Re)Placing Sexuality: Transnational Imaginations and Reconstituting Identity
공간과 성적 정체성의 재구성: 초구적 상상력과 정체성의 복원

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dc.contributor.advisor정진성-
dc.contributor.author해밀튼-
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-12T00:59:38Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-12T00:59:38Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-
dc.identifier.other000000152290-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/143247-
dc.description학위논문 (박사)-- 서울대학교 대학원 : 사회과학대학 사회학과, 2018. 8. 정진성.-
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation finds that where gay identity is seen as a foreign artifice or as a non-indigenous product of human evolution, gay migrant men are often forced to adjust gay identity for cultural fit, which requires spatial (re)placing and cross-cultural improvisation through the transnational imagination. This causes some gay men to reconstitute gay identity along spatial and cultural lines beyond their own sexual orientations and desires. This dissertation provides an original contribution to the study of sexual migration scholarship and is the first to explore the sexual identity changes of openly gay US men who migrate to South Korea. It adds to the growing narrative on gay identity in East Asia, while bringing to the fore the paradox of addressing sexual minority issues as a human rights concern rather than as a matter of sexual citizenship in the country. I use sociological methodologies and draw on the narrative accounts of openly gay US ex-patriots who migrated to Seoul from the late-90s to investigate how these men adjust to Korea's social conditions. Embedding my analysis in my informants transnational imagination of Korea culturally and socially, I also find that these men must relearn heteronormative expectations and masculinity, which greatly impact their being and belonging. Consequently, some begin to see gay identity as syncretic. They carefully mitigate their sexual behaviors to avoid risks, while relying on Korean role models and imitation. Others internalize gay identity as country-specific or culturally specific and see it in Korea as (1) antithetical to Korean values of filial piety and good citizenship-
dc.description.tableofcontentsNote on translations, transliteration, Korean names and pseudonyms........................9

Preface....................................................................................................................10

Chapter 1. Introduction...........................................................................................14

1.1 Chapter précis........................................................................................22

1.2 Purpose and methodology......................................................................26

1.2.1 Measures....................................................................................31

1.2.1.1 Informants and recruiting...................................................32

1.2.1.2 First interview....................................................................33

1.2.1.3 Second interview (tethering method).................................36

1.2.1.4 Embedded case study........................................................37

1.3 Ethical considerations.............................................................................38



Chapter 2. Transnational imaginations: a framework for rethinking

gay identity............................................................................................39

2.1 Disjuncture(s): theorizing gay identity cross-culturally...........................39

2.2 Gaying in the city and working it abroad: gay identity and

urbanization..........................................................................................53

2.3 Rethinking gay identity within cross-cultural processes............................60

2.4 Locating Korea theoretically....................................................................71



Chapter 3. Gay performativity through transnational imaginings

of Korea.................................................................................................85

3.1 Homosexuality and gay identity in Korea.................................................85

3.2 Relearning gender norms........................................................................95

3.3 Zones of flexible masculinities.................................................................99

3.3.1 Masculine "groupism" and brotherhood bonds........................101

3.3.1.1 Education and adolescence of the 1980s...........................105

3.3.1.2 Drinking culture.................................................................116

3.3.2 Military rites of passage...........................................................121

3.4 Gaying around and through Korean masculinities................................130

3.4.1 Performance of the Interchangeable........................................138

3.4.2 Performance of the Syncretic...................................................149



Chapter 4. Grounding gay identity in Korea: "home" as centrifugal force

in transnational imaginings of gay sexual identity.................................160

4.1 Moving in, beyond performance(s).......................................................160

4.1.1 Homing in and away from family...............................................164

4.1.1.1 Urban familialism and the push homeward..........................171

4.1.1.2 Homing in on the transnational imagination........................183

4.1.1.3 Home as a social and spatial comfort...................................192

4.1.2 Identity intersectionality and material spatialization of homes..198

4.1.3 Case studies..............................................................................201

4.1.3.1 Korean American................................................................201

4.1.3.2 Caucasian...........................................................................208

4.1.3.3 African American/ Black......................................................214

4.2 Screwing with and in "homes".............................................................220

4.2.1 Interchangeable........................................................................221

4.2.2 Syncretic...................................................................................223



Chapter 5. Outside(rs): performing through geographies of fear and

transnational imaginings of gay identity................................................224

5.1 Recognition, participation, and (re)education.......................................226

5.1.1 Spatial effects on fears and participation....................................240

5.1.2 Rerouting fears through mobiles and mobility............................246

5.2 Imagined and reinvented spatial fears: sufferings in silence?.................254

5.3 Bodily Survival......................................................................................261



Chapter 6: Conclusion............................................................................................274

6.1 Conclusive findings...............................................................................274

6.2 Implications for theory..........................................................................278

6.3 Further Research...................................................................................281



Afterward...............................................................................................................283

References..............................................................................................................285

Appendix A.............................................................................................................305

Appendix B.............................................................................................................307

Appendix C.............................................................................................................308

Appendix D.............................................................................................................310

Appendix E..............................................................................................................317

Appendix F..............................................................................................................323

Appendix G.............................................................................................................324

Acknowledgements.................................................................................................325
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dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisher서울대학교 대학원-
dc.subject.ddc302-
dc.title(Re)Placing Sexuality: Transnational Imaginations and Reconstituting Identity-
dc.title.alternative공간과 성적 정체성의 재구성: 초구적 상상력과 정체성의 복원-
dc.typeThesis-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthorHAMILTON ROBERT CHRISTOPHER-
dc.description.degreeDoctor-
dc.contributor.affiliation사회과학대학 사회학과-
dc.date.awarded2018-08-
Appears in Collections:
College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Dept. of Sociology (사회학과)Theses (Ph.D. / Sc.D._사회학과)
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