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19세기 마운틴 맨 유령의 현대적 귀환: 『레버넌트: 죽음에서 돌아온 자』에 나타난 백인 남성성
The Modern Return of a Nineteenth-Century Mountain Man’s Ghost: White Masculinity in The Revenant

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Authors
정진만
Issue Date
2017-06
Publisher
서울대학교 미국학연구소
Citation
미국학, Vol.40 No.1, pp. 263-290
Keywords
The RevenantHugh Glassmountain manVanishing Peoplemasculinitynationalism
Abstract
This essay explores racism, male-centrism, and nationalism (un)covered in Alejandro González Iñárritu’s The Revenant, focusing on its way of invoking white masculinity. Portraying the hero, Hugh Glass, romantically as a white affectionate toward Native Americans and mixed-bloods, The Revenant is reticent in expressing the historical reality of Glass as an aggressive Indian fighter who contributed to westward expansion. Even worse, the film silently instills the long-lasted racist (mis)belief about Native Americans (plus mixed-bloods) as the ‘Vanishing People’ by making an unbridgeable distance between Glass and his Pawnee wife (and his mixed-blood son). This essay would allow us to see the film’s strategy forging white Americans’ masculine robustness within the levels of gender, race, and nation, where other racial and national groups are characterized as effeminate and immoral in a complex way.
ISSN
1229-4381
Language
Korean
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/147002
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Researcher Institutes (연구소)American Studies Institute (미국학연구소)미국학미국학 Volume 40 Number 1/2 (2017)
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