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Engineering titanium dioxide nanostructures for enhanced lithium-ion storage

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dc.contributor.authorLee, Dae-Hyeok-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Byoung-Hoon-
dc.contributor.authorSinha, Arun K.-
dc.contributor.authorPark, Jae-Hyuk-
dc.contributor.authorKim, Min-Seob-
dc.contributor.authorPark, Jungjin-
dc.contributor.authorShin, Heejong-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kug-Seung-
dc.contributor.authorSung, Yung-Eun-
dc.contributor.authorHyeon, Taeghwan-
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-27T13:27:12Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-27T13:27:12Z-
dc.date.issued2018-12-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Chemical Society, Vol.140 No.48, pp.16676-16684-
dc.identifier.issn0002-7863-
dc.identifier.other79783-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/165877-
dc.description.abstractVarious kinds of nanostructured materials have been extensively investigated as lithium ion battery electrode materials derived from their numerous advantageous features including enhanced energy and power density and cyclability. However, little is known about the microscopic origin of how nanostructures can enhance lithium storage performance. Herein, we identify the microscopic origin of enhanced lithium storage in anatase TiO2 nanostructure and report a reversible and stable route to achieve enhanced lithium storage capacity in anatase TiO2. We designed hollow anatase TiO2 nanostructures composed of interconnected similar to 5 nm sized nanocrystals, which can individually reach the theoretical lithium storage limit and maintain a stable capacity during prolonged cycling (i.e., 330 mAh g(-1) for the initial cycle and 228 mAh g(-1) for the 100th cycle, at 0.1 A g(-1)). In situ characterization by X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that enhanced lithium storage into the anatase TiO2 nanocrystal results from the insertion reaction, which expands the crystal lattice during the sequential phase transition (anatase TiO2 -> Li0.55TiO2 -> LiTiO2). In addition to the pseudocapacitive charge storage of nanostructures, our approach extends the utilization of nanostructured TiO2 for significantly stabilizing excess lithium storage in crystal structures for long-term cycling, which can be readily applied to other lithium storage materials.-
dc.titleEngineering titanium dioxide nanostructures for enhanced lithium-ion storage-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor성영은-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor현택환-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/jacs.8b09487-
dc.citation.journaltitleJournal of the American Chemical Society-
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85057771979-
dc.citation.endpage16684-
dc.citation.number48-
dc.citation.startpage16676-
dc.citation.volume140-
dc.identifier.urlhttps://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jacs.8b09487-
dc.identifier.rimsid79783-
dc.identifier.sci000452693800041-
dc.description.isOpenAccessN-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorHyeon, Taeghwan-
Appears in Collections:
College of Engineering/Engineering Practice School (공과대학/대학원)Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering (화학생물공학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_화학생물공학부)
College of Engineering/Engineering Practice School (공과대학/대학원)Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering (화학생물공학부)Chemical Convergence for Energy and Environment (에너지환경 화학융합기술전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_에너지환경 화학융합기술전공)
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