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김지하의 한 담론: 60년대의 한 담론과의 비교를 중심으로
Kim Chi-Has Han Discourse: Focusing on comparison with the Han discourse of the 1960s

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Authors
후루타 도미다테(古田富建)
Issue Date
2019-11
Publisher
한국종교학연구회
Citation
종교학연구, Vol.37, pp. 93-119
Keywords
김지하한(恨)담론60년대 문학Kim Chi-HaHANdiscourse60’s Korean literature
Abstract
This paper examines the Han discourse of Kim Chi-ha, focusing on his religious view of the world in particular, based on the articles, interviews and court statements related to the Han discourse of Kim Chi-ha.
The Han discourse spoken in the literary circle in the 1960s was born from the necessity in search of Korean ethnic identity by pure literature school.It captured the colonial image of Korean art as the beauty of sorrow, and extracted the like of han from the work of the colonial poet Kim So-wol.
On the other hand, Kim Chi-ha transformed the Han, which was roughly conceptualized in the literary world in the 1960s, into a struggle for democratization, and seized Han as the energy of social change against the military dictatorship and driving force of resistance. It worked to instill a new concept in Han, and to inject Hans image that added its own definition to their own work.
In the 1960s, the literary world regarded subjects who hold Han as the people of the Korean Peninsula who share the history of hardship, including the invasion of foreign forces and the victims of feudal society, 김지하의 한 담론 119
but Kim Chi-ha brought up a new subject (victim) called the people who are oppressed by the military dictatorship at this very moment From the intangible perpetrator of history, the tangible perpetrator of dictatorship was born. As victim and perpetrator of Han were brought out, the inward Han which had only been piled up quietly, came to possess outward forces of anger and resistance.
Kim Chi-ha also pointed out the negative aspect of violence driven by the han brought about by the violence of power around 1980s, and argues that the thought of Dan should break the chain of violence.
He also believed that in a democratic world, the Han of value that was not appropriate for the new world would disappear. it shows that Kim Chi-ha actively tried to adopt religious values such as Donghaku and Christianity, and restrained himself from the revolution with violence.
Kim Chi-has Han discourse was increasingly moved away from the ethnic sentiment and in solidarity with democratization movements and activists in the world, it moved toward assimilation with the ideas of religious movements seeking social change.
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/171308
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College of Humanities (인문대학)Religious Studies (종교학과)종교학연구(Journal of Religious Studies) 종교학연구(Journal of Religious Studies) 37집(2019)
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