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Longitudinal analysis of Socioecological obesogenic factors in a National Sample of U.S. children

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dc.contributor.authorKim, TaeEung-
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Junhye-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chung Gun-
dc.contributor.authorJang, Chang-Yong-
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-21T06:54:57Z-
dc.date.available2021-01-21T15:57:14Z-
dc.date.issued2020-11-13-
dc.identifier.citationArchives of Public Health. 2020 Nov 13;78(1):116ko_KR
dc.identifier.issn2049-3258-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/171673-
dc.description.abstractBackground
Childhood obesity is a serious public health threat. Although many researchers conducted research on socioecological determinants of childhood obesity, their longitudinal effects remain inconclusive especially among young children. This study examined socioecological factors and associated transitions of childrens body mass index (BMI) status throughout childrens kindergarten to elementary school years, using data from a national longitudinal sample.

Methods
The baseline sample of this study included 1264 children (weighted N = 379,297) extracted from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (baseline mean age: 5.24 years). The socioecological framework guided selection of socioecological obesogenic variables (e.g., family activity and parental involvement). Longitudinal ordered logistic regressions were performed to determine the associations between socioecological obesogenic variables and unhealthy/healthy changes in BMI status that captured transitions between healthy and unhealthy weight status (i.e., overweight, obesity, and severe obesity).

Results
Children with Hispanic ethnicity and nonwhite, less socioeconomic and environmental support, and living in households with fewer family members were more likely than their counterparts to have unhealthy BMI status changes over time (all ps < 0.05). Over the study period, girls were less likely than boys to experience transitions to unhealthy BMI status (all ps < 0.05).

Conclusion
As hypothesized a priori, the findings of the current affirmed multiple dimensions of how sociological obesogenic factors may influence childrens BMI status changes in a longitudinal setting. In order to maintain childrens long-term healthy weight, more attention should be paid to socioeconomic obesogenic factors surrounding children as well as individual determinants of obesity (e.g., being physically active and having well-balanced nutrition).
ko_KR
dc.language.isoenko_KR
dc.publisherBMCko_KR
dc.subjectLongitudinal design-
dc.subjectBMI-
dc.subjectChildhood obesity-
dc.subjectSocioecological framework-
dc.titleLongitudinal analysis of Socioecological obesogenic factors in a National Sample of U.S. childrenko_KR
dc.typeArticleko_KR
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor김태응-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor권준혜-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor장창용-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13690-020-00494-z-
dc.citation.journaltitleArchives of Public Healthko_KR
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)-
dc.date.updated2020-11-15T04:09:32Z-
dc.citation.number1ko_KR
dc.citation.startpage116ko_KR
dc.citation.volume78ko_KR
Appears in Collections:
College of Education (사범대학)Dept. of Physical Education (체육교육과)Journal Papers (저널논문_체육교육과)
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