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Light inhibits COP1-mediated degradation of ICE transcription factors to induce stomatal development in arabidopsis

Cited 27 time in Web of Science Cited 27 time in Scopus
Authors
Lee, Jae-Hyung; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Park, Chung-Mo
Issue Date
2017-11
Citation
Plant Cell, Vol.29 No.11, pp.2817-2830
Abstract
Stomata are epidermal openings that facilitate plant-atmosphere gas exchange during photosynthesis, respiration, and water evaporation. Stomatal differentiation and patterning are spatially and temporally regulated by the master regulators SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, and FAMA, which constitute a central gene regulatory network along with Inducer of CBF Expression (ICE) transcription factors for this developmental process. Stomatal development is also profoundly influenced by environmental conditions, such as light, temperature, and humidity. Light induces stomatal development, and various photoreceptors modulate this response. However, it is unknown how light is functionally linked with the master regulatory network. Here, we demonstrate that, under dark conditions, the E3 ubiquitin ligase CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) degrades ICE proteins through ubiquitination pathways in leaf abaxial epidermal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. Accordingly, the ICE proteins accumulate in the nuclei of leaf abaxial epidermal cells in COP1-defective mutants, which constitutively produce stomata. Notably, light in the blue, red, and far-red wavelength ranges suppresses the COP1-mediated degradation of the ICE proteins to induce stomatal development. These observations indicate that light is directly linked with the ICE-directed signaling module, via the COP1-mediated protein surveillance system, in the modulation of stomatal development.
ISSN
1040-4651
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/172037
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1105/tpc.17.00371
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College of Natural Sciences (자연과학대학)Dept. of Chemistry (화학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_화학부)
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