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Frontal glucose hypometabolism in abstinent methamphetamine users

Cited 77 time in Web of Science Cited 86 time in Scopus
Authors
Kim, Seog Ju; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Hwang, Jaeuk; Sung, Young Hoon; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Dong Soo; Jeong, Do-Un; Renshaw, Perry F
Issue Date
2005-02-24
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Citation
Neuropsychopharmacology. 2005 Jul;30(7):1383-91.
Keywords
AdultAmphetamine-Related Disorders/*metabolism/physiopathology/radionuclideimagingBrain MappingCase-Control StudiesDemographyFemaleFluorodeoxyglucose F18/pharmacokineticsFrontal Lobe/*metabolism/physiopathology/radionuclide imagingGlucose/*metabolismHumansImage Processing, Computer-Assisted/methodsLinear ModelsMaleMiddle AgedNeuropsychological Tests/statistics & numerical dataPositron-Emission Tomography/methodsSex Characteristics
Abstract
Changes in relative regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) and their potential gender differences in abstinent methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Relative rCMRglc, as measured by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, and frontal executive functions, as assessed by Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST), were compared between 35 abstinent MA users and 21 healthy comparison subjects. In addition, male and female MA users and their gender-matched comparison subjects were compared to investigate potential gender differences. MA users had lower rCMRglc levels in the right superior frontal white matter and more perseveration and nonperseveration errors in the WCST, relative to healthy comparison subjects. Relative rCMRglc in the frontal white matter correlated with number of errors in the WCST in MA users. In the subanalysis for gender differences, lower rCMRglc in the frontal white matter and more errors in the WCST were found only in male MA users, not in female MA users, relative to their gender-matched comparison subjects. The current findings suggest that MA use causes persistent hypometabolism in the frontal white matter and impairment in frontal executive function. Our findings also suggest that the neurotoxic effect of MA on frontal lobes of the brain might be more prominent in men than in women.
ISSN
0893-133X (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=15726115

https://hdl.handle.net/10371/29055
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.npp.1300699
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Psychiatry (정신과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_정신과학전공)
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