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Correlates of existential well-being and their association with health-related quality of life in breast cancer survivors compared with the general population

Cited 14 time in Web of Science Cited 15 time in Scopus
Issue Date
2009-11
Publisher
SPRINGER
Citation
BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT; Vol.118 1; 139-150
Keywords
Breast cancer survivorsHealth-related quality of lifeExistential well-being
Abstract
The aim was to evaluate the correlates of existential well-being (EWB) and investigate the relationship between EWB and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) according to the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL) in breast cancer survivors (BCS) and in the general population. BCS (N = 1,933) recruited from five large hospitals completed a mailed survey, which included the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ-C30), Quality of Life Questionnaire Breast Cancer Module (QLQ-BR23) and the MQOL. Reference data were derived from a representative sample of the Korean adult population composed of 500 women selected by a nationwide random route technique. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that members of the general population with a lower educational status were more likely to report poor EWB. However, among BCS, correlates that were associated with poor EWB included lower monthly income, lower educational status, unemployment and comorbidities. Almost all factors listed on the HRQOL questionnaire were correlated with EWB in BCS as well as in the general population (P < 0.001). Factors listed on the QLQ-C30 that were correlated to a clinically meaningful extent with EWB in the general population included physical functioning, nausea and vomiting, and appetite loss, whereas among BCS, insomnia and distress over hair loss were meaningfully correlated with EWB. Compared with general population, BCS showed different EWB correlates and distinct associations with HRQOL findings. Our data suggest that socio-economic status and comorbidities influence on their EWB.
ISSN
0167-6806
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/77915
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-009-0326-0
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Surgery (외과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_외과학전공)
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