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Content Clauses in English

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Authors
Yang, In-Seok
Issue Date
1975
Publisher
서울대학교 언어교육원
Citation
어학연구, Vol.11 No.1, pp. 25-44
Abstract
In the case of J espersen (l964: 349-351), the term 'content clause' refers to both>
sentential complements and appositional complements. For example,
(1) a. He believes that the world is round.
b. He knows the fact that the world is round.
The italicized part of (la) which does not contain a head noun is a sentential complement, whereas the italicized part of (1b) which contains a head noun is an appositional corriplemenL Jespersen's term, 'content clause, refers to both categories. This paper, however, uses the term in a narrow sense which refers only to sentential complements which are preceded by head nouns.
In traditional grammars, content clauses were understood to the effect that head nouns and their content clauses constitute a syntactic appositional relationship. Furthermore, Jespersen (op. cit.) indicated that head nouns and their content clauses may be separated by Extraposition. With regard to content clauses, generative-transformational grammars have not much surpassed studies of traditional grammars, particularly in their semantic explorations.
ISSN
0254-4474
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/85537
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Language Education Institute (언어교육원)Language Research (어학연구)Language Research (어학연구) Volume 11 Number 1/2 (1975)
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