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결과표현의 유형
A Typology of Resu1tative Expressions

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dc.contributor.author와시오, 류이치-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-07T07:43:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-07T07:43:41Z-
dc.date.issued1997-09-
dc.identifier.citation어학연구, Vol.33 No.3, pp. 435-462ko_KR
dc.identifier.issn0254-4474-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/86080-
dc.description.abstractExpressions of the form NP1-V-NP,-AP in English which have been treated uniformly as "Resultatives" in the literature are here divided into three types, on the basis of the different semantic relations they express and their cross-linguistic distribution. They are: (i) STRONG resultatives, in which the meaning of the AP in the above schema is completely independent of the meaning of the verb (e.g., The horses dragged the logs smooth, where the lexical meaning of the verb does not contain anything like the notion of smoothness), (ii) WEAK resultatives, in which the meaning of the
AP is not completely independent of the meaning of the verb (e.g., I froze the ice cream solid, where the notion of solidness is already contained in the meaning of the verb to freeze), and (iii) SPURIOUS resultatives, in which the AP specifies the manner, not the result, of the activity described by the verb (e.g., He tied his shoelaces tight/loose) and which, therefore, are not resultative expressions in the strict sense of the term. Given these informal definitions, the so-called intransitive resultatives (e.g., The joggers ran the pavement thin) are always "Strong," since the verb here (run), being intransitive, cannot contain in its semantics anything like the notion specified
by the AP (thin). This trichotomy of resultative-like expressions is strongly motivated by the following cross-linguistic considerations. Thus, while English permits all the three types of expressions just mentioned, languages like Japanese permit only WEAK and SPURIOUS resultatives, and still other languages, such as French, basically permit only SPURIOUS resultatives. In this paper, we analyze Korean from the perspective of the above trichotomy, and conclude that it is another example of those languages which permit WEAK and SPURIOUS resultatives, but not STRONG resultatives,
including those based on intransitive (or "unergative") verbs.
ko_KR
dc.language.isokoko_KR
dc.publisher서울대학교 언어교육원ko_KR
dc.title결과표현의 유형ko_KR
dc.title.alternativeA Typology of Resu1tative Expressionsko_KR
dc.typeSNU Journalko_KR
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor驚尾龍一-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthorRyuichi, Washio-
dc.citation.journaltitle어학연구-
Appears in Collections:
Language Education Institute (언어교육원)Language Research (어학연구)Language Research (어학연구) Volume 33 Number 1/4 (1997)
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