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Hunmin jeongeum Haeryae(Sangjubon) and its Brush-written Notes
훈민정음 상주본에 대한 서지적 고찰

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Authors
Kim Juwon; Nam, Kwonhui
Issue Date
2014-10
Publisher
Hunmin jeongeum Society
Citation
SCRIPTA, Vol.6, pp. 1-32
Keywords
인문학
Abstract
This article aims to present a critical bibliography of a particular copy of Hunmin jeongeum haerye (訓民正音解例, Explanations and examples of the correct sounds for the instruction of the people), the existence of which was made known to the public on July 30th, 2008. It is called Hunmin jeongeum haerye Sangjubon (hereafter “Sangjubon”) following the city name where the book came to light. The purpose of this article is two-fold. It first provides a general bibliographic description of the book. Then, it further investigates when and why the brush-written notes inside the book were made through an examination of their content. We have reached the following conclusions: 1. Printed using the same woodblocks, Sangjubon belongs to the same edition as Gansongbon. Unlike Gansongbon which has truncated top and bottom margins, Sangjubon seems to be preserved in its original size. 2. The brush-written notes were written in the top and bottom margins of the pages containing the poetic summary of the “Explanation of the design of the letters.” Included in the notes are (i) a list of the 23 letters for “initial sounds” (consonants), each with an example and additional pieces of classificatory information regarding the Five Sounds, the Five Notes, and the laryngeal features (cheongtak 淸濁), (ii) a list of the 11 letters for “medials” (vowels), and (iii) a discussion on the correspondence between the Five Sounds and the Five Notes. 3. Regarding (iii) above, we show that the particular text the note writer referred to was the “Sìshēng wǔyīn jiǔnòng fǎnniǔtú xù” (四聲五音九弄反紐圖序), written by the Buddhist monk Shéngǒng (神珙) and contained in the Enlarged and expanded jade chapters (Dàguǎng yìhuì yùpiān 大廣益會玉篇, published in 1013 in the Northern Song). 4. Taking into consideration the Sino-Korean readings transcribed in the Korean alphabet next to the Chinese characters, we argue that the notes reflect Southeastern (Gyeongsang) dialect. We also date the notes to the 18th century or later.
ISSN
2092-7215
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/93536
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College of Humanities (인문대학)Linguistics (언어학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_언어학과)
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