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Genetic structure of wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations from East Asia based on microsatellite loci analyses

Cited 15 time in Web of Science Cited 14 time in Scopus
Authors
Choi, Sung Kyoung; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Young-Jun; Min, Mi-Sook; Voloshina, Inna; Myslenkov, Alexander; Oh, Jang Geun; Kim, Tae-Hun; Markov, Nickolay; Seryodkin, Ivan; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Lee, Hang; Kim, Kyung Seok
Issue Date
2014-07-17
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
BMC Genetics, 15(1):85
Keywords
MicrosatellitesEast AsiaGenetic diversityGenetic structureWild boar
Description
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.
Abstract
Abstract

Background
Wild boar, Sus scrofa, is an extant wild ancestor of the domestic pig as an agro-economically important mammal. Wild boar has a worldwide distribution with its geographic origin in Southeast Asia, but genetic diversity and genetic structure of wild boar in East Asia are poorly understood. To characterize the pattern and amount of genetic variation and population structure of wild boar in East Asia, we genotyped and analyzed microsatellite loci for a total of 238 wild boar specimens from ten locations across six countries in East and Southeast Asia.


Results
Our data indicated that wild boar populations in East Asia are genetically diverse and structured, showing a significant correlation of genetic distance with geographic distance and implying a low level of gene flow at a regional scale. Bayesian-based clustering analysis was indicative of seven inferred genetic clusters in which wild boars in East Asia are geographically structured. The level of genetic diversity was relatively high in wild boars from Southeast Asia, compared with those from Northeast Asia. This gradient pattern of genetic diversity is consistent with an assumed ancestral population of wild boar in Southeast Asia. Genetic evidences from a relationship tree and structure analysis suggest that wild boar in Jeju Island, South Korea have a distinct genetic background from those in mainland Korea.


Conclusions
Our results reveal a diverse pattern of genetic diversity and the existence of genetic differentiation among wild boar populations inhabiting East Asia. This study highlights the potential contribution of genetic variation of wild boar to the high genetic diversity of local domestic pigs during domestication in East Asia.
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/100558
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2156-15-85
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College of Veterinary Medicine (수의과대학)Dept. of Veterinary Medicine (수의학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_수의학과)
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