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Asthma diagnosis and treatment – 1023. The implementation of asthma management guideline and the obstacle factors in Korea

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dc.contributor.authorJo, Eun-Jung-
dc.contributor.authorKim, Mi Yeoung-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Suh Young-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Seoung-Eun-
dc.contributor.authorSong, Woo-Jung-
dc.contributor.authorKim, Sae-Hoon-
dc.contributor.authorCho, Sang-Heon-
dc.contributor.authorMin, Kyung-up-
dc.contributor.authorKim, You-Young-
dc.contributor.authorChang, Yoon-Seok-
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-03T02:08:21Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-03T11:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2013-04-23-
dc.identifier.citationWorld Allergy Organization Journal, 6(Suppl 1):82ko_KR
dc.identifier.issn1939-4551-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10371/138320-
dc.description.abstractBackground
Many bacterial components in indoor dust can evoke inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Bacteria secrete nanometer-sized vesicles into the extracellular milieu, but it remains to be determined whether bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles in indoor dust are pathophysiologically related to inflammatory pulmonary diseases. We evaluated whether extracellular vesicles (EV) in indoor air are causally related to the pathogenesis of asthma and/or emphysema.

Methods
EV were prepared by sequential ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation from indoor dust collected from a bed. Innate and adaptive immune responses were evaluated after once or 4 weeks airway exposure of EV, respectively.

Results
Vesicles 50-200 nm in diameter were present (102.5 microgram [based on protein concentration]/g dust) in indoor dust, and inhalation of 1 microgram of these vesicles for 4 weeks caused neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation. Additionally, polymyxin B (an antagonist of endotoxin, a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria) reversed the inflammation induced by the dust EV. Indoor dust harbors Esherichia coli-derived vesicles; airway exposure to the vesicles for 4 weeks induced neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema, which were partially eliminated by the absence of IFN-gamma or IL-17. Interestingly, serum dust EV-reactive IgG1 levels were significantly higher in atopic children with asthma than in atopic healthy children and those with rhinitis or dermatitis. Moreover, serum dust EV-reactive IgG1 levels were also elevated in adult asthma or COPD patients than in healthy controls.

Conclusions
EV in indoor dust, especially derived from Gram-negative bacteria, appear to be an important causative agent in the pathogenesis of asthma and/or emphysema.
ko_KR
dc.language.isoenko_KR
dc.publisherBioMed Centralko_KR
dc.titleAsthma diagnosis and treatment – 1023. The implementation of asthma management guideline and the obstacle factors in Koreako_KR
dc.typeOtherko_KR
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor조은정-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor김미영-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor이서영-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor이성은-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor송우정-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor김세훈-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor조상헌-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor민경업-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor김유영-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor장윤석-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1939-4551-6-S1-P22-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderJo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.date.updated2017-10-03T16:55:56Z-
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Internal Medicine (내과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_내과학전공)
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