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Associations between vascular risk factors and subsequent Alzheimer’s disease in older adults

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Authors
Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Kiwon; Lee, Yeong Chan; Kim, Soyeon; Won, Hong-Hee; Yu, Tae Yang; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kang, Jae Myeong; Lewis, Matthew; Kim, Doh Kwan; Myung, Woojae
Issue Date
2020-09-26
Publisher
BMC
Citation
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy. 2020 Sep 26;12(1):117
Keywords
Alzheimer’s diseaseLipidsBlood pressureRisk factor
Abstract
Background
The clinical guidelines related to the primary prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have focused on the management of vascular risk factors. However, the link between vascular risk factors and AD in older adults remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the association between vascular risk factors and subsequent AD in 178,586 older adults (age ≥ 65 years).

Methods
Participants were recruited from 2009 through 2010 and followed up for 6 years. We assessed various vascular risk factors (total cholesterol [TC], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides [TG], fasting glucose [FG], systolic blood pressure [SBP], diastolic blood pressure [DBP], pulse pressure [PP], and body mass index [BMI]) and their association with AD incidence, categorizing each vascular factor using current clinical guidelines.

Results
AD was observed in 6.0% of participants at follow-up. All lipid profiles (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and TG) were positively associated with the risk of AD. SBP and PP were in negative associations with AD, and DBP was positively associated with AD. BMI exhibited a negative association with AD incidence. We found no significant association between FG and AD risk. The sex difference was observed to have effects on vascular risk factors.

Conclusions
In this study, we comprehensively investigated the association between eight vascular risk factors and the risk of incident AD. Our findings suggest that multiple vascular risk factors are related to the development of AD in older adults. These results can help inform future guidelines for reducing AD risk.
ISSN
1758-9193
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/171071
DOI
doi.org/10.1186/s13195-020-00690-7
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Neurosurgery (신경외과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_신경외과학전공)
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