Browse

Human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer prevention in Japan and Korea

Cited 43 time in Web of Science Cited 42 time in Scopus
Authors
Konno, Ryo; Shin, Hai-Rim; Kim, Young-Tak; Song, Yong Sang; Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Masaki; Park, Jong-Sup
Issue Date
2008-11-01
Publisher
Elsevier
Citation
Vaccine. 2008;26 Suppl 12:M30-M42
Keywords
AdolescentAdultAgedAged, 80 and overCarcinoma in Situ/*diagnosis/mortality/*prevention & control/virologyChildChild, PreschoolDNA, Viral/isolation & purificationEarly Detection of CancerFemaleGuidelines as TopicHuman papillomavirus 16/isolation & purificationHuman papillomavirus 18/isolation & purificationHumansIncidenceInfantJapan/epidemiologyKorea/epidemiology*Mass ScreeningMiddle AgedPapillomavirus Infections/complications/diagnosis/*epidemiology/pathologyPapillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic usePrevalenceRisk FactorsUterine Cervical Neoplasms/*diagnosis/mortality/*prevention & control/virologyVaccinationVaginal SmearsYoung Adult
Abstract
Cervical cancer is a common cancer among women in Japan and Korea. Implementation of national cervical cancer screening programs has led to a reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer in both countries. However, over the past decade, there has been a recent marked increase in cervical cancer incidence among young women in Japan. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in the majority of cervical cancers, and HPV-16 and 18 are the two most common types. The next most frequent HPV types in cervical cancer are 52, 58 and 33 for Japan and 52, 58, and 33 for Korea, varying slightly when compared to the worldwide distribution. Screening coverage for both countries remains a challenge. Current coverage is reported at 24% in Japan, with the lowest coverage in young Japanese women, and 41% in Korea. Cytology remains the predominant screening method. HPV DNA testing is widely used to triage women with abnormal cytology in Korea. HPV vaccines have been licensed in Korea, but not yet in Japan. In both countries cost is a substantial impediment to implementation and no national programs are currently planned or in place. Therefore, increased disease awareness and utilization of screening is the first priority for controlling cervical cancer.
ISSN
0264-410X (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18945412

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6TD4-4TD5VXV-8-5&_cdi=5188&_user=168665&_orig=search&_coverDate=08%2F19%2F2008&_sk=999739999.8987&view=c&wchp=dGLzVtb-zSkzV&md5=ea16711cc7b6abb95b3a522c6c4b4418&ie=/sdarticle.pdf

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/68067
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.05.006
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Obstetrics & Gynecology (산부인과전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_산부인과학전공)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse