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高等學校 社會科敎育의 目標로서의 「市民의 資質」의 槪念 硏究
A Study on the Concept of Citizenship as an Objective of Secondary School Social Studies

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Authors
車京守
Issue Date
1984
Publisher
서울대학교 사범대학
Citation
사대논총, Vol.28, pp. 57-75
Abstract
It is predicted that the industrialization in Korea will be accelerated in the 1980's, and that citizenship education of social studies will be more needed to overcome some byproducts of rapid social change such as value conflicts, alienation, and social disorganization. Given these situations, the purpose of this paper is to analyze the concept of citizenship as an objective of social studies education in secondary schools, and to suggest some behavioral objectives of citizenship education which attention should be paid. in schools. It is assumed from the nature and developmental process of social studies that the social studies is a school subject which is primarily designed for citizenship education. with this assumption, to examine the meaning of citizenship, four standard college textbooks of social studies are analyzed. The four books are Teaching High School Social Studies, New York: Harper & Row, publishers 1955, 1968, by Maurice P, Hunt and Lawrence E. Metcalf, Teaching the New Social Studies in Secondary Schools, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 1966, by Edwin Fenton, Teaching strategies for the Social Studies, Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1977, by James A. Banks, and Socondary Social Studies, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1980, by Jack L. Nelson and John U. Michaelis. The results of the analyses show us that three behavioral objectives, among others, are most emphasized: inquiry, reflective thinking for decision making, value inquiry, and the discovery of structure. Here, we can find strong inffluences by How We Think, Boston: Heath, 1909, 1933, by John Dewey, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Cognitive Domain, New York: David Mckay Co., Inc., 1956, by Benjamin S. Bloom et al., and The Process of Education, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1961, by Jerome S. Bruner on the setting of educational objectives in social studies. Although three objectives of reflective thinking, value inquiry, and structure are emphasized as social studies objectives for citizenship, it may be said that reflective thinking occupies the basic and most important position. It is well known that cognitive development plays vital roles in the process of moral Judgment of Jean Piaget or in the learning of structure of Jerome Bruner. With the danger of oversimplification, it is suggested as a conclusion of this paper that reflective thinking is most needed for citizenship in industrializing Korea in the future.
ISSN
1226-4636
Language
Korean
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/72334
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College of Education (사범대학)Center for Educational Research (교육종합연구원)교육연구와 실천Journal of the College of Education (師大論叢) vol.28/29 (1984)
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