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Ageing in the United States at the End of the Century

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Authors
Bengtson, Vern L.; Mills, Teheran L.; Parroti, Tonya M.
Issue Date
1995-12
Publisher
Population and Development Studies Center, Seoul National University
Citation
Korea Journal of Population and Development, Vol.24 No.2, pp. 215-244
Abstract
The belief that America is a "young" nation is widely held by many individuals in the United States. Historically, individualism, self-reliance, and an orientation towards youth have been cherished values reflecting of our national heritage and tradition dating from the 18th through the mid-20th Century. However, America is no longer a "young" nation. Rather, we are an "aging" population, as we show in our analysis of demographic transitions reviewed in this paper. The phenomenon of "cultural (or structural) lag" is discussed in two different contexts: first-the context of the aging family; and second-the context of ethnic/racial minority groups. Finally, some of the relevant public policy responses to aging are described. We look at government programs in four major categories, namely, 1) income; 2) health care; 3) social services; and 4) housing.
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/85256
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Institute for Social Development and Policy Research (사회발전연구소)Development and SocietyKorea Journal of Population and Development Vol.24 No.1/2 (1995)
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