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Designing the Machine Age in America: Streamlining in the 20th Century

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Authors
Meikle, Jeffrey L.
Issue Date
2010
Publisher
서울대학교 미국학연구소
Citation
미국학, Vol.33 No.2, pp. 251-277
Keywords
Industrial DesignModernismEero SaarinenStreamlining
Abstract
Streamlining, the major U.S. commercial design style of the 1930s, was promoted by industrial designers who sought to eliminate sales resistance just as aerodynamic streamlining was intended to eliminate wind resistance. Popularized in 1934 by two passenger trains, the Union Pacific railroad’s M-10,000 and the Burlington railroad’s Zephyr, the style was introduced into the automotive market through the Chrysler Airflow and was quickly incorporated into non-vehicular consumer products. While 1930s streamlining expressed a cultural desire for stability and stasis during the Great Depression, the postwar variant, exemplified by the sharply angled, flaring automotive tailfin, expressed a popular faith in limitless technological progress. The architect Eero Saarinen, who had learned streamlining in the industrial design office of Norman Bel Geddes in the late 1930s, brought postwar streamlining to full expression in such projects as the TWA terminal in New York and Dulles airport in northern Virginia. During the 1990s a nostalgic retro mode of streamlining appeared in such products as the New Beetle automobile, the first Apple iMac computer, and the Smart car.
ISSN
1229-4381
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/88649
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Researcher Institutes (연구소)American Studies Institute (미국학연구소)미국학미국학 Volume 33 Number 1/2 (2010)
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