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The Great Migration and the Emergence of Black Havens in August Wilson's Joe Turner's Come and Gone and Toni Morrison's Paradise

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Authors
Kim, Yeojin
Issue Date
2015
Publisher
서울대학교 미국학연구소
Citation
미국학, Vol.38 No.2, pp. 61-87
Keywords
August WilsonToni MorrisonGreat MigrationProduction of Black SpaceTrauma of black migrantsJim Crow
Abstract
In this article, I situate August Wilson’s Joe Turner’s Come and Gone and Toni Morrison’s Paradise in the Great Migration (1915-1970) during the early- and mid-twentieth century. In so doing, I intend to show both the potential and limit of building all-black community against the white oppression in the US. Specifically, Seth Holly’s boardinghouse in Wilson’s play and the Convent in Morrison’s novel serve as a temporary shelter for African American wanderers but fail to produce a Utopian sanctuary for all-black community. Nonetheless, they become a stage where black migrants’ frustration, internal conflicts, rage, and trauma are projected and re-enacted. By reiterating the pathological symptoms of black migrants even in those sequestered, supposedly safe black havens, the two authors put the idea of all-black community in question and defer the moment of black migrants’ wish-fulfillment through which they dramatically expose the traumatized mentality of black migrants and their rootless wanderings.
ISSN
1229-4381
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/95308
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Researcher Institutes (연구소)American Studies Institute (미국학연구소)미국학미국학 Volume 38 Number 1/2 (2015)
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