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Manufacturing a German Model of Liberal Capitalism: The Political Economy of the German Cartel Law in the Early Postwar Period

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Authors
Cho, Chansoo
Issue Date
2003-06
Publisher
Institute of International Affairs, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University
Citation
Journal of International and Area Studies, Vol.10 No.1, pp. 41-57
Keywords
cartel lawdecartelizationdeconcentrationGermanyU.S. foreign policyErhardsocial market economytwo-level gamessectoral analysis
Abstract
This article examines the West German cartel policy process during the early 1950s. Decartelization was one of the top priority agendas of the United States, which was operating as a new stabilizer of bourgeois Europe during this time. The combined efforts of Americans and their German allies to liberalize Germany’s organized capitalism met with fierce resistance from both much of the business community and ordinary Germans. It took almost a decade for the Germans to conclude a cartel law, and it was a political process wherein different sectors of industry, Christian Democrats, and U.S. policymakers interacted with each other. A jointed approach that combines two-level games and sectoral analysis is useful to understanding the divergence of decartelization and deconcentration in Germany, which had the effect of watering down the original cartel law. The German experience provides a case of embedding liberalism into an illiberal social purpose that was to maintain cooperation within the markets.
ISSN
1226-8550
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/96386
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Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Dept. of International Studies (국제학과)Journal of International and Area StudiesJournal of International and Area Studies vol.10 (2003)
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