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Constraints on Environmental News Production in the U. S.: Interviews with American Journalists

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Authors
Yang, Jung-Hye
Issue Date
2004-12
Publisher
Institute of International Affairs, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University
Citation
Journal of International and Area Studies, Vol.11 No.2, pp. 89-105
Keywords
American journalismenvironmental reportingnews sociologyobjectivity
Abstract
This study interviewed American environmental journalists to identify diverse forces that influence environmental newsmaking. The interview revealed that concerns for possible legal problems, perceived pressure from the advertisers, journalists’ lack of scientific knowledge and technical training influence the way environmental news is produced. Specifically, the interview generated the following findings. First, journalists assume that environmental newsmaking is basically identical to general news production. Second, as a whole journalists’ investigations on corporate activities arc discouraged: the intensity of criticism is mitigated by the fear of their story being removed or their “getting into trouble.” Third, concerns about legal disputes tend to refrain journalists from investigative reporting. Fourth, journalists’ strong commitment to the professional ideology of objectivity leads them generally to define every event in terms of ‘two different sides’ of stories. Finally, journalists’ lack of scientific knowledge and training make them heavily dependent on official sources.
ISSN
1226-8550
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/96405
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Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Dept. of International Studies (국제학과)Journal of International and Area StudiesJournal of International and Area Studies vol.11 (2004)
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