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The optimal balance between sexual and asexual reproduction in variable environments: a systematic review

DC Field Value Language
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yun Young-
dc.contributor.authorKim, Jae Geun-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-01T02:36:39Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-01T02:36:39Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-24-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Ecology and Environment, 40(1):12ko_KR
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/100354-
dc.descriptionThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to
the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
ko_KR
dc.description.abstractAbstract
Many plant species have two modes of reproduction: sexual and asexual. Both modes of reproduction have often been viewed as adaptations to temporally or spatially variable environments. The plant should adjust partitioning to match changes in the estimated success of the two reproductive modes. Perennial plants showed that favorable habitats in soil nutrients or water content tend to promote clonal growth over sexual reproduction. In contrast, under high light-quantity conditions, clonal plants tend to allocate more biomass to sexual reproduction and less to clonal propagation. On the other hand, plants with chasmogamous and cleistogamous flowers provides with a greater tendency of the opportunity to ensure some seed set in any stressful environmental conditions such as low light, low soil nutrients, or low soil moisture. It is considered that vegetative reproduction has high competitive ability and is the major means to expand established population of perennial plants, whereas cleistogamous reproduction is insurance to persist in stressful sites due to being strong. Chasmogamous reproduction mainly enhances established and new population. Therefore, the functions of sexual and asexual propagules of perennial or annual plants differ from each other. These traits of propagule thus determine its success at a particular region of any environmental gradients. Eventually, if environmental resources or stress levels change in either space or time, species composition will probably also change. The reason based on which the plants differ with respect to favored reproduction modes in each environmental condition, may be involved in their specific realized niche.
ko_KR
dc.language.isoenko_KR
dc.publisherBioMed Centralko_KR
dc.subjectBenefitko_KR
dc.subjectChasmogamyko_KR
dc.subjectCleistogamyko_KR
dc.subjectCostko_KR
dc.subjectFitnessko_KR
dc.subjectRealized nicheko_KR
dc.subjectSecessionko_KR
dc.subjectTrade-offko_KR
dc.titleThe optimal balance between sexual and asexual reproduction in variable environments: a systematic reviewko_KR
dc.typeArticleko_KR
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor양윤영-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor김재근-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s41610-016-0013-0-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)-
dc.date.updated2017-01-06T10:57:18Z-
Appears in Collections:
College of Education (사범대학)Dept. of Science Education (과학교육과)Biology (생물전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_생물전공)
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