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Profiling bacterial community in upper respiratory tracts

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dc.contributor.authorYi, Hana-
dc.contributor.authorYong, Dongeun-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kyungwon-
dc.contributor.authorCho, Yong-Joon-
dc.contributor.authorChun, Jongsik-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-06T08:31:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-06T08:31:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Infectious Diseases, Vol.14, p. 583-
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334-
dc.identifier.other91698-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/100453-
dc.descriptionThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.ko_KR
dc.description.abstractBackground: Infection by pathogenic viruses results in rapid epithelial damage and significantly impacts on the condition of the upper respiratory tract, thus the effects of viral infection may induce changes in microbiota. Thus, we aimed to define the healthy microbiota and the viral pathogen-affected microbiota in the upper respiratory tract. In addition, any association between the type of viral agent and the resultant microbiota profile was assessed. Methods: We analyzed the upper respiratory tract bacterial content of 57 healthy asymptomatic people (17 health-care workers and 40 community people) and 59 patients acutely infected with influenza, parainfluenza, rhino, respiratory syncytial, corona, adeno, or metapneumo viruses using culture-independent pyrosequencing. Results: The healthy subjects harbored primarily Streptococcus, whereas the patients showed an enrichment of Haemophilus or Moraxella. Quantifying the similarities between bacterial populations by using Fast UniFrac analysis indicated that bacterial profiles were apparently divisible into 6 oropharyngeal types in the tested subjects. The oropharyngeal types were not associated with the type of viruses, but were rather linked to the age of the subjects. Moraxella nonliquefaciens exhibited unprecedentedly high abundance in young subjects aged <6 years. The genome of M. nonliquefaciens was found to encode various proteins that may play roles in pathogenesis. Conclusions: This study identified 6 oropharyngeal microbiome types. No virus-specific bacterial profile was discovered, but comparative analysis of healthy adults and patients identified a bacterium specific to young patients, M. nonliquefaciens.-
dc.language.isoenko_KR
dc.publisherBioMed Centralko_KR
dc.subjectMicrobiome-
dc.subjectRespiratory tract-
dc.subjectMoraxella-
dc.subjectInfluenza-
dc.subjectOropharynx-
dc.subjectHealthcare staff-
dc.titleProfiling bacterial community in upper respiratory tracts-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor천종식-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12879-014-0583-3-
dc.citation.journaltitleBMC Infectious Diseases-
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84964315557-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderYi et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.date.updated2017-01-06T10:02:22Z-
dc.citation.startpage583-
dc.citation.volume14-
dc.identifier.urlhttps://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-014-0583-3-
dc.identifier.rimsid91698-
dc.identifier.sci000344962700001-
dc.description.isOpenAccessY-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorChun, Jongsik-
Appears in Collections:
College of Natural Sciences (자연과학대학)Dept. of Biological Sciences (생명과학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_생명과학부)
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