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Drosophila selenophosphate synthetase 1 regulates vitamin B6 metabolism: prediction and confirmation

Cited 11 time in Web of Science Cited 12 time in Scopus
Authors
Lee, Kwang Hee; Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Jin Young; Jung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eunji; Carlson, Bradley A; Xu, Xue-Ming; Park, Jin Mo; Hatfield, Dolph L; Park, Taesung; Lee, Byeong Jae
Issue Date
2011-08-24
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
BMC Genomics, 12(1):426
Description
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background
There are two selenophosphate synthetases (SPSs) in higher eukaryotes, SPS1 and SPS2. Of these two isotypes, only SPS2 catalyzes selenophosphate synthesis. Although SPS1 does not contain selenophosphate synthesis activity, it was found to be essential for cell growth and embryogenesis in Drosophila. The function of SPS1, however, has not been elucidated.

Results
Differentially expressed genes in Drosophila SL2 cells were identified using two-way analysis of variance methods and clustered according to their temporal expression pattern. Gene ontology analysis was performed against differentially expressed genes and gene ontology terms related to vitamin B6 biosynthesis were found to be significantly affected at the early stage at which megamitochondria were not formed (day 3) after SPS1 knockdown. Interestingly, genes related to defense and amino acid metabolism were affected at a later stage (day 5) following knockdown. Levels of pyridoxal phosphate, an active form of vitamin B6, were decreased by SPS1 knockdown. Treatment of SL2 cells with an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate synthesis resulted in both a similar pattern of expression as that found by SPS1 knockdown and the formation of megamitochondria, the major phenotypic change observed by SPS1 knockdown.

Conclusions
These results indicate that SPS1 regulates vitamin B6 synthesis, which in turn impacts various cellular systems such as amino acid metabolism, defense and other important metabolic activities.
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/100468
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-12-426
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College of Natural Sciences (자연과학대학)Dept. of Biological Sciences (생명과학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_생명과학부)
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